What You Need to Know About Disinheritance

Understanding what will happen to your assets when you die can be confusing. If you do not have a Last Will and Testament, your assets will be divided per Massachusetts’ intestacy laws. However, if you do have a Last Will and Testament, you can make determinations about who will inherit your property. Likewise, you can also make decisions about who your Last Will and Testament will exclude. This – leaving heirs out of a Last Will and Testament who would otherwise inherit your property – is known as disinheritance.

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Lessons from Prince’s Poor Estate Planning

The death of Prince wasn’t just sad; it also raised questions about how to divide his estate. While Prince was intensely protective of his music, it appears he was less so when it came to his physical assets; in fact, he did not even have a Last Will and Testament or Trust. Prince’s lack of estate plan highlights the importance of planning what will happen to your assets when you are gone.

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Helping Your Parents with Their Estate Planning

As your parents age, helping them to form an estate plan, and finding out what their wishes are for themselves and their assets upon their death, becomes more and more important. While having these talks can be hard, doing so can ensure that your parents are able to live out their lives without monetary headaches, and that when they die, their desires for their estate will be adhered to. Here are some questions to ask your parents about their estate, and how to help them plan for the future:

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Estate Planning Issues for Same-Sex Couples: What You Need to Know

While marriage has finally been recognized as a right that all couples can engage in, regardless of whether they are gay or straight, same-sex couples still face unique issues when planning for end of life and their estates, particularly if they are not married. The following are issues same-sex couples need to consider when planning their estate.

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Westport Elder Law Lawyer

No one likes to think about getting old and the fact that they may need assisted care in order to live a long and healthy life. Even more so, no one likes to think about death, and how they will provide for themselves as the day nears, and continue providing for their families once they’re gone. However, aging is inevitable; at some point, we will all have to face the fact that we are not as young as we once were. For assistance in understanding some of the many components of preparing for an elderly age, Patricia Bloom-McDonald, Attorney at Law, is ready to help.

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